This topic contains 15 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  dommy 5 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #2754

    So what
    Participant

    Its fair to say that May wasn’t exactly liked as Home Sec, she then became PM and made a stupid decision to call a snap election. It probably wasn’t a stupid decision at the time she called the election but the electorate decided otherwise.

    Seems like Theresa is fighting an awful lot of fires right now from all fronts and the “Tried and Tested” method of putting Labour front and centre isn’t working quite as well as hoped.

    How long can the Conservative Party prop Theresa May up before the next General Election?

  • #2755

    freddo
    Participant

    Seems like Theresa is fighting an awful lot of fires right now from all fronts and the “Tried and Tested” method of putting Labour front and centre isn’t working quite as well as hoped.

    It’s hardly not working, she still has the ‘Corbyn’s a commie spy’ press broadly on side, probably fully so now they’ve replaced a powerful remainer in cabinet. The Windrush story will fizzle in the right wing press, she’s probably done what was needed to save her skin by appointing Javid.

    How long can the Conservative Party prop Theresa May up before the next General Election?

    I still can’t see either of the Tory factions wanting to risk upsetting the apple cart until one of them is obviously on the losing side of brexit, for now it’s not at all clear which side it’ll be that has to take the risk of ousting her.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by  freddo.
  • #2757

    torie
    Participant

    I think that she’ll be gone in the summer recess as her diabetes gets worse (a perfect excuse) and there will be a more competent replacement.

    I would go with Rory Stewart.

  • #2758

    Aly
    Participant

    How long can the Conservative Party prop Theresa May up before the next General Election?

    Far too long.

    If Corbyn was moderate, competent and willing to fight Brexit this government would be history. But he’s not.

    • #2760

      burp
      Participant

      Agreed. He should be tearing May apart at PMQ’s but he cannot land a telling blow.

  • #2759

    burp
    Participant

    It would seem that Theresa May had targets while she was at the Home Office.

    So when, Rudd made a mistake of not knowing about targets, why did the previous head of the Home Office not correct her?

    I’m of the opinion that the PM was more aware of a cover up and she politically choose not to correct this situation.

    Not exactly honorable for an incumbent PM.

    • #2761

      Div
      Participant

      It’s a strange world where when the person barely responsible for something as despicable as windrush resigns (but not directly for that, rather for misleading parliament) we’re supposed to be satisfied that the person actually responsible carries on regardless.

      May created the policy, created the hostile environment, oversaw Rudd carrying on her policy, knew the truth about targets, and, if we didn’t already know it, is clearly unfit for her position. How she’s got the brass neck to carry on is beyond me.

      • #2762

        doormat
        Participant

        FFS the problems with the ‘Windrush’ generation started before they set foot on the boat, it continued throughout the following decades.

        I don’t like the idea of billboards saying (and I paraphrase) ‘go home’, the way that a small (tiny?) minority of the Windrush generation have been treated has been a disgrace but this is not a Tory bad, Labour good issue and to seek to trivialise it as such actually does further damage as it muddies the waters as to what is a sensitive subject at the best of times.

    • #2765

      gaz
      Participant

      I’m of the opinion that the PM was more aware of a cover up and she politically choose not to correct this situation.

      Of course she did. There is a memo from Rudd to May discussing deportation targets. She just kept her mouth shut hoping her sidekick could talk her way out of it.

      On Thursday the signs are that the tories are going to get slaughtered in the elections in the English cities. How they will do in the shires will, in my view, determine whether or not she remains leader of the party. If you want rid of her and you live in England, you know what to do on Thursday.

  • #2763

    dopey
    Participant

    Seems like windrush is just a distraction as the unelected lords and ladies, continue to derail an electoral vote. Be curious to see how this plays out.

    • #2764

      torie
      Participant

      Just how and why is it that you do not understand the basics of the British constitution and of our Parliamentary democracy? Which we established after a very nasty civil war in the C17th, and a well-named ‘Glorious Revolution’ shortly thereafter? And which just about every other western democracy has roughly copied (we being fortunate enough to have been rather a long way ahead with our essential revolution)? Because nothing better has yet been devised. The ‘Lords’ cannot veto, they can only reject for amendment/improvement. Every sound democracy needs a two-tier system. The American, French, German, Canadian and Australian systems are arguably as good. The irony, in our system, is that the Conservatives have by far the biggest number of Lords (245), and the much-maligned Church members (‘the Lords Spiritual’) number just 28. Yet they still generally give the Conservative Government in the Commons a hard time. Basically, it is a chamber of wisdom and sanity, and the standard of debate is astronomically higher than in the Commons. If you can devise a better system, please tell us what it is.

      • #2766

        dopey
        Participant

        I will agree with you that a chamber made of wise folk refining laws is needed and worthwhile, no I don’t think there is a better solution, although the Swiss model might be. What I’m against are them changing the course of referendums as I said it will be interesting to see how it plays out, as nothing is a foregone conclusion.

        • #2768

          torie
          Participant

          I’ve no idea what you mean by the ‘course of a referendum’. It implies something quite sinister like the ‘course of a fire’ or a ‘trip to the scaffold’, i.e. something which no one can do anything about. Because, of course, you don’t want ‘the people’ to be able to do anything about it now, do you?

    • #2767

      erick
      Participant

      They aren’t changing the result of the referendum.

      I get the impression everyone will end up disappointed.

  • #2769

    Bear
    Participant

    May isn’t really up to it but right now is not the time to change. Gove has all the credibility of Basil Fawlty, Boris, well sorry, no, just no. Normally there would be choice but Corbyn is useless, even if you are prepared to believe he’s sincere (sorry, I’m not) he’s still useless.

    So just at the time we decide we need the strongest leader/poker player/visionary thinker etc etc we have this bunch. They deserve us, and after that vote we certainly deserve them!

  • #2770

    dommy
    Participant

    How long May has is inextricably bound up with the progress of the brexit process. Her downfall will only come when it becomes clear which faction within the Conservatives have to oust her to keep their objective alive. Sure it may well be wrapped up in some hastily confected outrage over some past misdeed as Home Secretary or a dodgy business deal or unpaid parking fine (ok, maybe not the parking) but the challenge won’t come until it’s clear who stands to lose most by sticking with her. She won’t sack herself and Labour are toothless without Murdoch on side.

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