This topic contains 19 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  carl0 5 months, 1 week ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #3342

    carl0
    Participant

    So, multi-car pile-up on the motorway (no serious injuries thankfully). I stop, but as I’m easing into the middle lane to bypass the mess another vehicle hits me and I’m shunted into the car at the rear. No dispute as to this among the other involved parties so fairly straight forward…or so I thought. Going through the details with the insurance company a couple of hours later, the reg of the car that hit me doesn’t match the actual vehicle involved.

    If the bloke turns out to be uninsured I still get paid out (fully comp), but minus the excess (not a huge deal). More importantly, I’ll lose many years no claims, even though I’m not at fault. Is this standard or are my insurers being arses?

  • #3343

    bimber
    Participant

    are my insurers being arses?

    ..and we have a winner folks………….

    • #3344

      carl0
      Participant

      Arse like behaviour may be a given but is revoking my no claims status standard practice in the industry?

  • #3345

    callum
    Participant

    Have you protected your no claims bonus?

    • #3346

      carl0
      Participant

      No. Taking out insurance on my insurance just seemed absurd.

      • #3351

        callum
        Participant

        Maybe not it seems.

        • #3352

          carl0
          Participant

          Insurers pushing you to buy insurance on your insurance is just taking the piss.

        • #3353

          callum
          Participant

          Good luck with that.

        • #3354

          carl0
          Participant

          From your 3 “helpful” comments on this thread I can only assume that you work for Quote Me Happy’s ‘Department For Screwing Even More From The Hapless Motorist” and you’re pissed off cos you’ve missed your quarterly target.

        • #3355

          callum
          Participant

          No, I just see it like this you take out insurance, make a claim, then whine because the policy is applied even though the insurance company offered sensible protection for something that has genuine value – then you quote someone who was completely irresponsible by driving whilst unfit to support your juvenile whining – grow up.

        • #3356

          damon
          Participant

          @callum You must admit that the concept of insuring your insurance is a bit ridiculous?

        • #3358

          callum
          Participant

          You’re insuring something of value and a no claims discount can be a substantial value, that’s what insurance is for. It costs me £30 extra on a policy that costs £1100 to protect my no claims, why wouldnt you and you’d be foolish not too.

        • #3359

          callum
          Participant

          A foolish person didn’t protect his no claims discount and made a claim, so he’s lost his no claims discount, his choice. His risk probably has gone up, but now he has the pleasure of of paying 100% of that premium rather than 50% (or whatever NCD he had and has now lost) and that applies if he shops around for a lower premium too. Penny wise pound foolish.

        • #3361

          carl0
          Participant

          @callum No, not really. I’ve had two accidents in 30 years of driving. One my fault and one not. If I’d paid to protect my NCB for all those years for the sake of one claim I’d be seriously out of pocket.

          Paying to insure your insurance only makes sense if you’re in the habit of driving like a nob.

        • #3360

          dantheman
          Participant

          The value or insuring your insurance is simply to remove the anxiety provoked by losing the NCB. Like all insurance it doesn’t make overall financial sense (on average the insurers charge more than they pay out). Unlike third party insurance there is no moral or legal imperative to have it.

          In this case the, anxiety is frequently significant (we wouldn’t be having this discussion if the OP hadn’t been worried about it in the first place). I once worked in a call centre shared by claims handlers, even in really bad accidents (where people were seriously hurt) it appeared that losing NCB was a lot of peoples’ main concern.

          The NCD is really a dumbed-down cipher for actuarial risk calculation but it is well understood by the market and an industry norm. As a concept it must distort the market to some extent and there will be winners and losers in this distortion (compared with a fully realised risk assessment). I guess what you are actually paying for is insurance that pays out the difference between the full NCB and accident adjusted NCB policy costs but I’ve no idea how this actually works (especially if you transfer insurers carrying the full NCB).

        • #3357

          bimber
          Participant

          @callum But then if you make a claim, you keep your no-claims but your ‘risk’ goes up – so your premium does as well. So even protected no-claims doesn’t stop a premium increase after a claim (irrespective of fault).

          Of course, if you’ve been a loyal customer for years that is also an excuse for increasing premiums. I’m a very low risk driver (1 small claim by the Mrs, no points, don’t drive much) and found my insurers were taking the mick. Shopping around reduced it by half.

  • #3347

    burp
    Participant

    Even unprotected you don’t lost all your no claims, I’ve got about 15 years, apparently I’d lose 4 for a claim.

    But no claims doesn’t work like you think. So if you have a clean record and 5 years no.claims, the discount comes off the base price, and then penalties for age, location, job etc go on.

    If you have speeding or previous claims they put those extras on too. So ultimately no claims or not it only discounts a fraction of your total insurance.

  • #3348

    chris
    Participant

    If the vehicle turns out to be uninsured your insurance company should be able to recover the costs from the MIB (motor insurance bureau) However this won’t cover everything and therefore you will need to claim however I believe you can claim your excess back through the MIB.

    Different insurers behave differently and not all cover is the same cheapest is not always best. Direct Line for instance make a point that incidents with uninsured or unidentified 3rd parties do not effect your NCB (provided it doesn’t happen too often)

  • #3349

    clifford
    Participant

    Someone sideswiped my car when it was parked up in the street. I claimed but lost my no claims as there was no one to claim against. In Industry parlance it’s a fault claim, as in mine. Still galls me i have to put down as a fault every time I renew my insurance.

  • #3350

    daveb
    Participant

    No claims is nonsense. I crashed a car falling asleep at the wheel (sorry, 17 hours in theatre takes it out of you and I know I shouldn’t have been driving). Lost my 20+ years no claims. Bit of shopping around and next year’s premium was an extra £20. Less than it would have cost to ‘protect’ it.

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